30.1 | Aagje Swinnen, Cynthia Port, and Valerie Barnes Lipscomb

Exploring the Boundaries of Literary Age Studies “Exploring the Boundaries of Age Studies,” a roundtable at the MLA convention in Philadelphia in January 2017, was proposed by members of the Modern Language Association’s Age Studies Forum as a response to this year’s Conference’s Presidential Theme: “Boundary Conditions.”

30.1 | Lynn Botelho

Preface | Old Age is Not a Modern Invention At times, it seems that Old Age is something that only we post-moderns have had to think about, let alone deal with its physical and economic consequences, or the cultural polarization that renders the elderly as wise or foolish, rich or poor, healthy or sick, or… Continue reading 30.1 | Lynn Botelho

Gillis J. Dorleijn | Literaire muziek. Een demonstratie van een “intermediale” lectuur voorafgegaan door enkele opmerkingen over intermedialiteit

Abstract Intermedialiteit is in. Ongetwijfeld is de enorme impact van de nieuwe media daar debet aan. Mediatheorie en -geschiedenis lopen aan de frontlinie van het culturele onderzoek. De literatuurwetenschap wil niet te zeer achterblijven en hijst met intermedialiteit de vlag van de vernieuwing. Helemaal onproblematisch is dat niet, want de term intermedialiteit mag dan hip… Continue reading Gillis J. Dorleijn | Literaire muziek. Een demonstratie van een “intermediale” lectuur voorafgegaan door enkele opmerkingen over intermedialiteit

Lauren Hoogen Stoevenbeld | Living a Dream: History and Fiction in Danilo Kiš’ “A Tomb for Boris Davidovich” and “The Encyclopedia of the Dead”

Abstract In this article I compare two stories by Yugoslavian author Danilo Kiš, “A Tomb for Boris Davidovich” and “The Encyclopedia of the Dead,” which address the problems and possibilities of writing a truthful history. Although the stories seem to contradict each other, I will argue that in fact they do not. Instead, when read… Continue reading Lauren Hoogen Stoevenbeld | Living a Dream: History and Fiction in Danilo Kiš’ “A Tomb for Boris Davidovich” and “The Encyclopedia of the Dead”

Jantine Broek | “Back in a World I Understood”: On True War Stories about Women in Vietnam

Abstract In the West, we know the Vietnam War as a conflict where political, physical, and emotional borders frequently became blurred. This article focuses on the war’s role in literature as such a time and place of “in-betweeness” which requires a constant switching between fact and fiction to describe. It identifies two “unbelievable” narrative ele-ments… Continue reading Jantine Broek | “Back in a World I Understood”: On True War Stories about Women in Vietnam

Elena Lamberti | Fake News, Cognitive Pollution and Environmental Awareness

Abstract This essay pursues the idea that within our new media eco-systems fake news, trolling—and other forms of unethical pseudo-communication—are simply an updated version of the age-old idea of mythmaking. This is a phenomenon which could be better navigated if literature is regarded as a probing tool, as in the teachings of the Toronto School… Continue reading Elena Lamberti | Fake News, Cognitive Pollution and Environmental Awareness

Doro Wiese | In Formation

Abstract In this article, I investigate how the characteristics of information—speed, instantaneity, newness, impersonality—influence human perception. I contrast these characteristics with the artwork Moule by Anna Lena Grau, a work that slows down understandings and asks its audience to take their time in making sense of it. If an artwork slows down processes of meaningmaking,… Continue reading Doro Wiese | In Formation

31.2 | Grant Bollmer

The Sense of Connection, or, Complex Narratives and the Aesthetics of Truth This article explores fact and fiction in digital culture by linking “complex” or “networked” narrative forms in television, Alternate Reality Games (ARGs), and other transmedia forms of storytelling—with the persistence of paranoid models of knowledge and post-critical modes of judgment. It argues that… Continue reading 31.2 | Grant Bollmer

31.2 | Anna Poletti

The Fiction of Identity: Drag, Affect, Genres, Facticity This article considers drag as an artform that queers identity through its use of techniques of fictionality that explore and problematize the body as the material ground for truth claims for identity. It examines a recent controversy regarding the position of trans performers within the global media… Continue reading 31.2 | Anna Poletti